Aviation Technology, Inc. Partners with Robert DeLaurentis to Power the Flying Thru Life Program with the Life Saving AltAlert™

Del Mar, CA (May 28, 2015) – San Diego-based pilot Robert DeLaurentis is currently making headlines and logging flight miles with his ambitious and inspiring Flying Thru Life program – and its about-to-launch global flight mission.

But soon, Robert may also be known as something else:

The AltAlert™ Ambassador.

Conceived by the noted aviation speaker, author and real estate entrepreneur, Flying Thru Life is designed to help businesses and individuals go far beyond what they ever believed was possible. Its tagline is “Achieving Altitude In Your Business And Life.”

Robert has logged more than 1,100 flight hours, and has acquired more than 300 real estate units – accumulating the latter over a 28-year period. The many lessons he’s learned along his winding journey serve as the basis for Flying Thru Life.

Starting in San Diego and encompassing 27 stops and approximately 27,000 nautical miles, Robert’s planned global trip is slated to begin on May 15, 2015. Robert says his main goals for the trip are to increase awareness, affect positive change in the world, and draw new people into aviation.

Impressed with his idea and motivated to help further ensure his safety during the global flight mission, Del Mar, CA-based Aviation Technology, Inc. decided to get on board with Robert and Flying Thru Life. The AltAlert™ will help make sure he has added safety, security, and peace of mind in the cabin of his single engine 1997 Piper Malibu Mirage.

Robert has flown his plane solo to 30 countries over the past three years, crossing the Polar Ice Cap, the North Atlantic Ocean, Bering Sea and Gulf of Mexico along the way. As part of his new partnership with Aviation Technology, Inc., Robert’s trusty plane now features the colorful AltAlert™ logo, and more importantly, Robert is utilizing the world’s first and only personal cabin pressure monitor on his travels across the globe.

Robert is utilizing AltAlert™ because he believes in the powerful product and because he fully understands the serious risk posed to pilots by hypoxia and other cabin pressure problems. These risks are even more serious when a pilot is flying alone.

An unresponsive condition caused by a lack of cabin pressure, hypoxia has been identified as the culprit in several tragic aircraft accidents, including the one that claimed golf legend Payne Stewart’s life in 1999 and the 2014 crash that proved fatal for TBM Owners and Pilots Association Chairman Larry Glazer and his wife Jane. The AltAlert™ personal cabin pressure monitor has been created to alleviate the safety and security risks posed by hypoxia and provide a new level of personal protection and peace of mind to pilots, crew members, and passengers alike.

Developed using exclusively licensed NASA technology, AltAlert™ provides a secondary sensing and alerting system for aircraft cabin pressurization and can be easily worn or mounted within the cabin. AltAlert™ actually monitors aircraft cabin altitude, thus mitigating the risk associated with hypoxia, which is typically difficult (if not impossible) to recognize.

Once activated by installation of the included battery, the lightweight and portable AltAlert™ device enters “sleep mode” while at ground level, then begins sampling pressure and battery voltage every 15 seconds during climb, and while in level flight at altitudes above sea level. Relative cabin pressure and battery status is indicated via a series of LED color changes and alarm tones on the device.

The stylish, sleek and small AltAlert™ may be easily mounted on a flat surface in the cockpit or cabin of the aircraft, clipped to a visor, or worn anywhere sound is not muffled by clothing.

“This device is about the size of a typical, small-footprint pager or cell phone,” said Aviation Technology President and CEO Stacy Pappas Sawaya. “Small enough and lightweight enough to clip onto a lapel or visor, or mount on a cabin surface. It can provide a new measure of confidence and risk-mitigation for pilots, passengers and crew.”

Hypoxia can often be a “silent killer.” Symptoms are slow in onset and may initially go unrecognized. The portable and affordable AltAlert™ serves as a safeguard to pilots, crew members and passengers.

Robert is excited to take his new AltAlert™ along for his newest journey in a life full of great adventures. As a solo pilot in a single-engine aircraft, he understands more than anyone just how important it is to take extra precautions to prevent cabin pressure problems.

“I’m so excited to embark on this journey as part of Flying Thru Life, and I’m very grateful to have AltAlert™ onboard for the entire adventure,” said Robert. “Together, we can help increase awareness about so many aspects of aviation – including limiting and preventing serious risks related to cabin pressure problems.” 

About Aviation Technology Inc. & AltAlert™

Developed under exclusive license from NASA, Aviation Technology Inc. created the world’s first and only personal cabin pressure monitor: AltAlert™AltAlert™ brings a new level of protection and peace of mind to pilots, passengers and crew. The portable and durable AltAlert™ is adept at detecting cabin pressure problems, such as slow cabin pressure leaks. Affordable and easy-to-use, AltAlert™ is ideal for preventing slow onset hypoxia, which has been identified as the culprit in numerous fatal plane crashes. AltAlert™ is about the size of a cell phone, and can be either clipped to the visor or mounted on a flat surface. It works by acutely monitoring aircraft cabin altitude and sounding an alarm when aircraft cabin pressure is compromised. It’s a brilliant piece of aviation engineering that provides peace of mind at any altitude. You can learn more about Aviation Technology, Inc. and AltAlert™ online at www.aviationtechnologyinc.com

About Robert DeLaurentis & Flying Thru Life

Hailing from Salamanca, NY and currently residing in San Diego, CA, Robert DeLaurentis is a noted aviation speaker, author and real estate entrepreneur. Holding an undergraduate degree in Accounting from USC and an advanced graduate degree in Spiritual Psychology from the University of Santa Monica, Robert also served in the Navy for 14 years, reaching the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Robert conceived and launched Flying Thru Life to help businesses and individuals go far beyond what they ever believed was possible, increase awareness of aviation and affect a positive change in the world. Robert has logged more than 1,100 flight hours and flown to 30 countries in his single-engine 1997 Piper Malibu Mirage, and will launch an ambitious 27,000-mile global trip on May 15, 2015. The many lessons he’s learned along his winding journey serve as the basis for Flying Thru Life. To learn more about Robert & Flying Thru Life, visit http://flyingthrulife.com.


San Diego, California (PRWEB)
April 21, 2015

Small Aircraft Pilot Will Be First Ever to Fly Across the Mid-Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans in a 90-Day Solo Trip

Circumnavigating the globe for three months in a 1997 Piper Malibu Mirage airplane is an ambitious endeavor. But the ground-breaking solo trip, which will raise money for the AOPA Scholarship Fund, is well planned for by pilot, Robert DeLaurentis, who is the founder of Flying Thru Life in San Diego, California.

The young or old, male or female interested in aviation will soon find out that it is possible to fly between countries and continents in a small aircraft. DeLaurentis, an experienced pilot who has flown solo to many places around the world with another 25 country trip starting on May 18, 2015, believes that with the proper training, preparation and gear this type of travel adventure can be both fun and safe.

The Piper Malibu Mirage aircraft will be on its first worldwide trip, which according to statistics on the  Earthrounders website, is the first attempt by a pilot flying alone. The plane will be equipped with a “Blue Tech” incubator and demonstration platform for Innovative Aviation Technology in San Diego, California. The features include:

  • Nanoceramic coating called ‘Flight Shield’ installed by Clean Wings Aviation on the plane to improve range and fuel efficiency by making the skin of the plane more slippery..
  • Four bladed composite MT Propellers with symitar blades and nickel tips, which is the first time this has ever been installed on a Piper Malibu Mirage airplane in the United States by Advanced Aircraft.
  • The Plane’s engine is being used to build the first Electroair electronic ignition ever put on a Piper Malibu Mirage with a Lycoming engine installed by High Performance Aircraft.
  • The aircraft will be using the Garmin Flightstream 210 for a Bluetooth connection between the Garmin GTN 750 and an Apple iPad installed by Neal Avionics.
  • Aviation Technology’s, Alt Alert cabin pressurization sensor will be used as a backup for the onboard system.

“It’s just fun and a lifetime dream fulfilled,” DeLaurentis states. “I am looking forward to becoming the first Piper Malibu Mirage to fly solo pilot to fly across the mid Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans, especially as this raises money for a great organization, AOPA.”

According to an article on flying around the world on the pilot website, Solo Flights Around the Word, “thorough preparations are the key to a successful flight, and time spent in preparation is an investment that will bear fruit throughout the flight.” The article points out that experience matters more than the number of flight hours logged along with the proper planning.

Robert DeLaurentis will release his book, Flying Thru Life, after his return from his solo trip, circumnavigating the world. He is a sought after speaker, pilot, and entrepreneur who brings encouragement and wisdom through his writings and talks. Flying Thru Life has quickly become a premier resource for private pilots and businesses and is recommended by clients at MMOPA, AirVentures, MOAA, and Big Bear Airport Pilots Association.

For more information on Robert DeLaurentis and to book a speaking engagement, please contact Robert.


Aviation Technology, Inc. Partners with CAPS & Aircraft Spruce to Introduce Game-Changing AltAlert™ Personal Cabin Pressure Monitor

Del Mar, CA (April 20, 2015) – Late last year, Aviation Technology, Inc. broke new ground in aircraft cabin safety and security with the launch of the revolutionary new AltAlert™ device.

And now, the world’s first and only personal cabin pressure monitor will be integrated into a wide range of flight crew training programs – and made available for purchase at a leading aviation supply company – thanks to a pair of groundbreaking partnerships.

Del Mar, CA-based Aviation Technology, Inc. has teamed up with Van Nuys, CA-based Corporate Air Parts, Inc. and its exclusive and acclaimed CAPS Flight Crew Training programs to introduce the AltAlert™ to all its trainees. The durable, portable and easy-to-use device will also be made available for purchase to all program trainees. It currently retails for just $399.

“CAPS is proud to partner with Aviation Technology, Inc. and offer the revolutionary AltAlert™ personal cabin pressure monitor,” said CAPS Director of Operations & Development Earl Marchesi. “In addition to adding this great product to our sales inventory of cabin safety equipment, the personal pressure monitor is a great fit for our Hypoxia and Emergency Crewmember training programs. And like our own LAND/Shark®, we share in Aviation Technology’s pride knowing that the AltAlert™ is manufactured in California, USA.”

An unresponsive condition caused by a lack of cabin pressure, hypoxia has been identified as the culprit in several tragic aircraft accidents, including the one that claimed golf legend Payne Stewart’s life in 1999 and the 2014 crash that proved fatal for TBM Owners and Pilots Association Chairman Larry Glazer and his wife Jane.

The AltAlert™ personal cabin pressure monitor has been created to alleviate safety and security risks posed by hypoxia and other cabin pressure problems, such as slow cabin pressure leaks. And to provide a new level of personal protection and peace of mind to pilots, crew members and passengers alike.

Developed using exclusively licensed NASA technology and brought to market by exclusive patent holder Aviation Technology, Inc., AltAlert™ provides a secondary sensing and alerting system for aircraft cabin pressurization that can easily be worn or mounted within the cabin. AltAlert™ actually monitors aircraft cabin altitude – not blood oxygen levels – thus mitigating the risk associated with hypoxia, which is typically difficult (if not impossible) to recognize.

Once activated by installation of the included battery, the lightweight and portable AltAlert™ device enters “sleep mode” while at ground level, then begins sampling pressure and battery voltage every 15 seconds during climb, and while in level flight at altitudes above sea level. Relative cabin pressure and battery status is indicated via a series of LED color changes and alarm tones on the device.

“This device is about the size of a typical cell phone,” said Aviation Technology President and CEO Stacy Pappas Sawaya. “Small enough and lightweight enough to clip onto a lapel or visor, or mount on a cabin surface. It can provide a new measure of confidence and risk-mitigation for pilots, passengers and crew.”

Hypoxia can often be a “silent killer.” Symptoms are slow in onset and may initially go unrecognized. The portable and affordable AltAlert™ serves as a safeguard to pilots, crew members and passengers.

“Even the best trained pilots and OEM-supplied warning systems have suffered a lapse in cabin altitude awareness,” said Pappas Sawaya. “The AltAlert closes this gap and can save lives.”

Thanks to Aviation Technology Inc.’s new partnership with Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Company, AltAlert™ will be available for purchase at this leading aviation supply company.

"Aircraft Spruce is committed to offering only the finest in aviation products, and AltAlert™ certainly fits that description. We are proud to carry this invaluable and innovative device, and confident that it will enhance your safety and security up in the air," said Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Company Owner, Jim Irwin.

 ---------------------------------------------------------

About Aviation Technology Inc. & AltAlert™

Developed under exclusive license from NASA, Del Mar, CA-based Aviation Technology Inc. created the world’s first and only personal cabin pressure monitor: AltAlert™. AltAlert™ brings a new level of protection and peace of mind to pilots, passengers and crew. The portable and durable AltAlert™ is adept at detecting cabin pressure problems, such as slow cabin pressure leaks. Affordable and easy-to-use, AltAlert™ is ideal for preventing slow onset hypoxia, which has been identified as the culprit in numerous fatal plane crashes. AltAlert™ is about the size of a cell phone, and can be either clipped to the visor or mounted on a flat surface. It works by acutely monitoring aircraft cabin altitude and sounding an alarm when aircraft cabin pressure is compromised. It’s a brilliant piece of aviation engineering that provides peace of mind at any altitude. You can learn more about Aviation Technology, Inc. and AltAlert™ online at www.aviationtechnologyinc.com
 

About Corporate Air Parts, Inc. & CAPS Flight Crew Training

Headquartered in Van Nuys, CA and managed by Corporate Air Parts, Inc., CAPS Flight Crew Training prides itself on delivering training programs designed to meet the many needs and requirements of pilots and aircrews in corporate and general aviation. All CAPS training is competitively priced, relevant, interesting, known for exceeding required course contents and presented in a truly “hands-on” fashion. Training meets all applicable regulations for emergency procedures training as required under CFR Parts 91, 125, 135, JAR OPS1, IS-BAO standards. Certificates of training are issued for one year. CAPS Flight Crew Training programs include Cabin Safety Training, Corporate Flight Attendant Training, Crewmember Emergency Training, Emergency Procedures Training, Executive Frequent Flyer Training, Inflight Medical, Initial Emergency Procedures Training and Recurrent Emergency Procedures Training. To learn more about Corporate Air Parts, Inc. & CAPS Flight Crew Training, visit http://www.corpairparts.net/Training_Overview.html.
 

About Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Company

Based in Corona, CA, Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Company is the leading aviation supply house in the world. Aircraft Spruce carries everything a pilot could need, including pilot supplies and aircraft parts, always at the lowest prices. Aircraft Spruce supplies components for a wide variety of homebuilt aircraft including the Lancair, Vans Aircraft, Cozy, Starduster and Europa – as well as factory-built parts for Cessna, Piper, Beech and Mooney. Products include Garmin avionics, tools, charts, propellers, spruce, software, instruments, aircraft engines, aviation headsets and landing gear components. Aircraft Spruce also carries a full line of aviation grade hardware, covering supplies, composite materials, airframe parts, electronic components and steel and aluminum. To learn more, visit www.aircraftspruce.com.


Aviation Technology Debuts AltAlert Personal Cabin Pressure Monitor

Aviation Technology’s AltAlert provides audible and visual alerts when cabin altitude climbs to dangerous levels. The device can fit in a pocket or be mounted on the aircraft window.

Aviation Technology’s AltAlert provides audible and visual alerts when cabin altitude climbs to dangerous levels. The device can fit in a pocket or be mounted on the aircraft window.

While aircraft that fly in the flight levels have pressurization-failure warning systems, accidents involving apparently hypoxic pilots keep happening. Stacy Pappas Sawaya, president and CEO of Carlsbad, Calif.-based Aviation Technology, researched these types of accident and invented a new portable warning device–the AltAlert “personal cabin pressure monitor”–that pilots can use to help detect a pressurization failure well before it causes hypoxia. AltAlert can also help remind pilots flying unpressurized high-altitude aircraft that it’s time to don oxygen masks.

The AltAlert device is easy to carry into any aircraft and can either clip onto a shirt pocket or be suction-cupped to a window near the pilot’s field of view. Both aural and LED visual alarms warn the pilot that the cabin altitude is climbing above specific thresholds. AltAlert is available from many pilot shops and retails for $399.95.

The AltAlert is based on a NASA patent, but what Sawaya and her engineering team did was develop algorithms that make the device work reliably and consistently with a long battery life of 18 months. “It took about four years from the concept to getting it completely developed and bringing it to market,” she said.

I started researching the number of accidents logged with the NTSB related to pressurization,” Sawaya explained. “The Payne Stewart accident was the most highly publicized, but the total number is enormous. It was really just a coincidence that the TBM 900 went down last September; we were finishing up by then. It was yet another example of the need for this device and its lifesaving capabilities.”

AURAL AND VISUAL WARNINGS

AltAlert is built around a pressure sensor. The algorithm drives six alarm modes, from nothing until 10,000 feet to combinations of a flashing LED and audible chirps at various higher altitudes. Above 10,000 feet, the red light flashes every 15 seconds along with a single “courtesy” chirp. Above 11,500 feet, the light flashes every five seconds and two chirps warn the pilot that cabin altitude has reached that level. Above 12,500 feet, the light flashes every second and there is a triple chirp. At this point the AltAlert also starts a 30-minute timer and if the aircraft’s altitude is between 12,500 and 14,999 feet after that interval, it switches to the above-15,000-foot alarm (the highest alarm). The above-14,000-foot alarm is flashes a red LED every second, but adds a constant double chirp. Above 15,000 feet, the LED and the chirp both remain on constantly. The first four modes can be muted, but once above 14,000 feet, the device cannot be muted.

I tested the AltAlert in a Cessna 172 with another pilot. We both used a pulse oximeter to measure our oxygen saturation as we climbed to 12,500 feet west of Van Nuys, Calif. We were going to go higher, but the 172 would have taken too long to climb the remaining 1,500 feet and we had no supplemental oxygen. Also, we felt that our oxygen saturation numbers precluded remaining at high altitudes any longer.

The AltAlert worked as advertised, and the LED was clearly visible and the chirps audible even with my passive headset on. It’s difficult to say whether the AltAlert would capture a pilot’s attention during a cabin pressurization problem, but it would certainly be useful to have as a backup device and it should increase the chances that pilots or even a passenger flying in the other seat might notice that there is a cabin-altitude problem. Where it seems AltAlert could really help is during a slow decompression, especially in an airplane without an automatic emergency-descent autopilot mode.

We’re really excited about it,” said Sawaya. “It’s been lot of hard work and a lot of sacrifice.” One pilot bought an AltAlert after experiencing a slow leak caused by a failing door seal. “He was getting hypoxic,” she said, “and was able to recognize it and do an emergency landing before any tragic consequences. He said, ‘I wish I had this a year ago. I’m one of the lucky ones.’ To be able to put something like this on the market for a reasonable price is something we’re really proud of.”

http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/business-aviation/2015-03-21/aviation-technology-debuts-altalert-personal-cabin-pressure-monitor



Loss of cabin pressure
Luxair plane in emergency landing at Findel

Published on Friday, 13 February, 2015 at 14:12, LUXEMBURGER WORT

(CS/vb) A plane on its way back to the Grand Duchy from Geneva on Thursday evening had to make an emergency landing at Luxembourg airport after experiencing a loss in cabin pressure.

According to Luxair, the loss in cabin pressure was gradual and the pilot was able to lodge the signal for an emergency landing with airport authorities.

The plane safely touched down in Findel and none of the 17 passengers were harmed in the incident.

According to the airline, the loss in cabin pressure was not big enough to trigger the release of oxygen masks.

While none of the passengers or crew showed immediate health issues, a spokesperson added that they could occur up to two days after the incident.   http://www.wort.lu/en/luxembourg/loss-of-cabin-pressure-luxair-plane-in-emergency-landing-at-findel-54ddf82d0c88b46a8ce5371d


Cabin Pressure Monitors Notify Pilots to Save Lives

Article taken from Spinoff 2015

 NASA Technology 

PressureMonitor.jpg

Typical cruising altitudes for business and commercial aircraft are up to 50,000 feet or more. At such altitudes, the oxygen concentrations in the air are much lower than on the ground. Occupants could not survive in this environment without pressure inside the aircraft being controlled to maintain oxygen concentrations consistent with those at lower altitudes. 

One startling tragedy that illustrated the importance of cabin-pressure regulation took place in 1999 when a Learjet was flying golf champion Payne Stewart from Orlando to Dallas. Six minutes after the Learjet pilots reported that all was well, the aircraft ceased communication with the air traffic controllers. Military aircraft in the vicinity were able to view the aircraft but reported that frost or condensation obscured most of the windshield and no movement could be seen inside the jet. Eventually, the plane ran out of fuel and crashed. There were no survivors. 

When the National Transportation Safety Board investigated the accident, it found that the plane had experienced a loss of cabin pressure, and all onboard were incapacitated due to hypoxia, an insufficient supply of oxygen to the body’s tissues and organs. 

If sudden cabin depressurization occurs in an aircraft like a Learjet flying at 40,000 feet, the pilots and passengers may initially experience a brief euphoria and then have as little as 5 to 12 seconds of useful consciousness to don their oxygen masks. Following this brief period, without supplemental oxygen, their cognitive and motor skills diminish, leading to incapacitation, often with fatal consequences. 

However, Stacy Pappas, founder and owner of Aviation Technology Inc. (AV Tech), based in San Diego, says an instance of depressurization is rarely so sudden or dramatic, making it all the more dangerous. 

“Assuming that the cabin-pressure warning system installed on the aircraft is working properly, a warning light, and in some cases a warning tone, in the cockpit alerts crewmembers that their cabin pressurization is approaching a dangerous level,” Pappas says. 

Usually, the pressurization system either has failed or was not turned on in the first place. 

“When you combine a subtle malfunction with a failure of the aircraft warning system, which was likely the case in the Stewart accident, the crew becomes slowly incapacitated without any awareness of the situation,” says Pappas. 

“To me, it’s a needless accident,” she says. “In such cases, a simple, redundant warning system is all that is needed to protect the crew and passengers from a slow, insidious onset of hypoxia. Even if the pressurization system fails, all the pilot would need is a backup notifier that could tell him or her to reduce the aircraft’s altitude for safe oxygen levels.” 

In addition to having value for pilots, such a monitor could alert NASA astronauts to a loss of pressure when training in a vacuum chamber used by NASA to simulate lunar and Martian environments. The device could also assist in alerting the crew on the International Space Station if a depressurization event occurs. 

Not long after the Payne Stewart accident, Jan Zysko, an engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, invented a cabin pressure monitor (CPM) to provide early warning of hypoxic conditions. Zysko displayed the device at the Oshkosh Air Show in Wisconsin, where several pilots told him of their brushes with hypoxia-related symptoms, and how fortunate they felt to have lived through them. After the show, Zysko investigated the number of similar cabin-pressure failure incidents and found it to be surprisingly high.

Technology Transfer 

Over the course of only six months, the NASA CPM went from prototype to a fully functioning unit, and in 2002, a company licensed the technology from NASA and started selling it (Spinoff 2003). In 2003, the CPM won both NASA’s government and commercial Invention of the Year awards in recognition of its value, not only on planes and in space, but potentially for skydivers, balloonists, mountain climbers, meteorologists, and people working in altitude chambers and underwater habitats, among others. 

A decade later, the company that originally licensed the technology went out of business, and the license returned to Kennedy Space Center. That was when Pappas learned about the pressure monitor from a colleague of her father’s and felt an immediate, personal connection to the technology. 

“My father had a love of aviation from the time he was a child,” she says, adding that he worked as an airline pilot and opened a jet-flying school. “By the time that I could walk and talk, my dad had immersed me in aviation.” 

When she heard about the CPM, she called NASA and did the work to obtain an exclusive license for the technology. 

Working with her team of engineers and designers, Pappas built a new product from start to finish, based on the original NASA concept. She addressed everything from the battery-powered circuit board to testing devices for the technology to the aesthetic design of the product. In about a year, she produced an all-new CPM based on the size, feel, and look of a smart phone. 

Benefits 

Launched in 2014, AV Tech’s Alt Alert is a personal altitude pressurization monitor that is smaller and lighter than most cell phones. It comes with three different mounting options, including a backing with suction cups for window mounting, a backing with Velcro for mounting against the instrument panel, and a clip to attach it to a visor. 

As an aftermarket product, the Alt Alert is an option for pilots of pressurized aircraft—jets or airliners that fly above 15,000 feet—to take with them in their professional pilot’s flight bag. It is currently available for all pilots of pressurized aircraft in the United States, a market that could mean tens of thousands of customers. In the future, Pappas plans to offer the technology to international markets as well. 

  Download PDF of NASA Spinoff 2015 Article

 

Download PDF of NASA Spinoff 2015 Article

Alt Alert features an alarm and LED light that alert pilots when the cabin pressure is compromised. Typically, aircraft maintain cabin pressures that are consistent with an altitude of 8,000 feet or so. 

“If you are at 35,000 feet, the cabin should have pressurization measuring anywhere from 8,500 to a maximum of 10,000 feet,” Pappas says. If the pressure inside the cabin falls below the equivalent of 10,000 feet, the device makes an advisory chirp and the LED flashes. If the pressure-altitude exceeds 12,500 feet, a 30-minute timer starts, and if it stays above 12,500 feet but below 15,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes, an un-mutable, sustained alarm will sound and the LED will flash. “This same alarm mode will be in effect if the aircraft cabin pressure exceeds 15,000 feet for any period of time,” Pappas says. 

These alarms are designed to go off well before the advanced onset of hypoxia. Once alerted, the pilot can identify and correct the pressurization issue or immediately reduce altitude and use supplemental oxygen. 

“Oftentimes, pilots don’t realize their pressurization system has failed. If it does fail, or simply was not turned on prior to flight, and the pilots have adequate notification, they will have ample time to take action,” says Pappas. “It could save lives.” 


September, 2014   Press Release

 

“AVIATION TECHNOLOGY, INC™. LAUNCHES BREAKTHROUGH PERSONAL PROTECTION DEVICE FOR PILOTS AND PASSENGERS!”

 The revolutionary Alt Alert™ Personal Cabin Pressure Monitor, provides early audible and visual warnings of potentially dangerous aircraft cabin altitudes, delivering an important back-up to factory installed cabin pressure warning systems.

San Diego, September 18, 2014: Developed using NASA technology and licensed from NASA under US Patent 6,452,510, the Alt Alert™ is the world’s first and only wearable/mountable instrument providing a secondary sensing and alerting system for aircraft cabin pressurization that actually monitors aircraft cabin altitude, not blood oxygen levels.

The most recent example of aircraft cabin pressure failure is the tragic loss of Larry and Jane Glazer. Their small SOCATA TBM 700 plane was en route to Naples, Florida when Mr. Glazer radioed that they were having problems. In less than 30 minutes, U.S. military pilots flying alongside could see the pilot slumped over the controls, apparently still breathing. They reported seeing frost covering the inside of the cabin windows. It is thought that they suffered from hypoxia, caused by a loss of cabin pressure. Their plane later crashed 20 miles off the coast of Jamaica.

Company President and CEO, Stacy Pappas Sawaya, is the daughter of a veteran commercial and corporate aviation professional. Her unique awareness of the need for the device was inspired by recent headlines about loss of cabin pressure, sometimes resulting in catastrophic consequences. She noted that “even the best trained pilots and OEM supplied warning systems occasionally suffer a lapse in cabin altitude awareness; system redundancy may save lives.”

She went on to state that “this device is about the size of a typical, small-footprint pager or cell phone…small enough and lightweight enough to clip onto a lapel or visor, or mount on a cabin surface. It can provide a new measure of confidence and risk-mitigation for pilots, passengers, and crew”.

This amazing new device is remarkably affordable, simple to use, and ready to go, right out of the box, providing users peace of mind on any aircraft with a pressurized cabin!

Stacy is proud to have designed and produced the Alt Alert™, right in her own “backyard” in San Diego, working with her state-of-the-art team of engineers and aviation experts.


Introducing the Revolutionary New AltAlert™ Personal Cabin Pressure Monitor


Del Mar, CA (January 13, 2015) – It’s time for a new attitude about altitude. And better yet, improved safety and security in the skies.

It’s time for the revolutionary new AltAlert™ personal cabin pressure monitor.

Air travel is so ingrained in our modern lifestyle, we rarely consider any safety risks. If we do have concerns about air travel safety, it’s usually on a grand scale, and involves massive mechanical failure.

The word “hypoxia” isn’t even in most peoples’ vocabulary. But behind the scenes and up in the skies, hypoxia (an unresponsive condition caused by a lack of cabin pressure) is a very real concern when it comes to air travel. In fact, hypoxia has been identified as the culprit in several tragic aircraft accidents, including the one that claimed golf legend Payne Stewart’s life in 1999 and the 2014 crash that proved fatal for TBM Owners and Pilots Association Chairman Larry Glazer and his wife Jane off the coast of Jamaica.

The AltAlert™ personal cabin pressure monitor has been created to alleviate these concerns. And to provide a new level of personal protection and peace of mind to pilots and passengers alike.

Developed using exclusively licensed NASA technology and brought to market by exclusive patent holder Aviation Technology, Inc., AltAlert™ is the world’s first and only personal cabin pressure monitor. This brilliant wearable and mountable instrument provides a secondary sensing and alerting system for aircraft cabin pressurization that actually monitors aircraft cabin altitude – not blood oxygen levels. AltAlert™ thus mitigates the risk associated with hypoxia, which is typically difficult (if not impossible) to recognize.

Once activated by installation of the included battery, the lightweight and portable AltAlert™ device enters “sleep mode” while at ground level, then begins sampling pressure and battery voltage every 15 seconds during climb, and while in level flight at altitudes above sea level. Relative cabin pressure and battery status is indicated via a series of LED color changes and alarm tones on the device. 

The stylish, sleek and small AltAlert™ may be easily mounted on a flat surface in the cockpit or cabin of the aircraft, clipped to a visor, or worn anywhere sound is not muffled by clothing. “This device is about the size of a typical, small-footprint pager or cell phone,” said Aviation Technology President and CEO Stacy Pappas Sawaya. “Small enough and lightweight enough to clip onto a lapel or visor, or mount on a cabin surface. It can provide a new measure of confidence and risk-mitigation for pilots, passengers and crew.” 

Hypoxia can often be a “silent killer.” Symptoms of hypoxia are slow in onset, and may initially go unrecognized. The portable and affordable AltAlert™ helps serve as a safeguard to both pilots and passengers, and a strong “backup system” in the skies. “Even the best-trained pilots and OEM-supplied warming systems occasionally suffer a lapse in cabin altitude awareness,” said Pappas Sawaya. “System redundancy may save lives.” 

With so much at stake up in the air, isn’t it worth making the small but secure investment in safety that the AltAlert™ helps provide?


Recent Hypoxia Related News and Links





Small plane with unresponsive pilot crashes into Gulf of Mexico - 

http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/19/us/gulf-aircraft-search/index.html


New evidence: Payne Stewart's plane lost pressure before crash - 

http://www.cnn.com/US/9911/23/stewart.crash.03/

http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=9839